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Books T - V

Taken By Trains -  The Life and Photographs of William Nash, 1909-1952
by
Kate Robinson & Robert Forsythe

William Nash acquired his first camera at the age of 13. He was besotted by trains from his earliest years and they formed his favourite subjects. These factors came together in remarkable photographs taken by a teenager in the 1920s. In turn there followed a successful career with the London Midland & Scottish Railway before William lost his life in the Harrow Railway Disaster on the 8th October, 1952. William's pictures record the inter-war British railway scene, whilst his correspondence conducted in Esperanto with railwaymen across the world creates a poignant portrait of the gathering storm in the 1930s in which he took great interest.

Between 1926 and 1952 he worked on the railway starting out in a signal box at the time of the General Strike. His talents were recognised with promotion. In World War II he was Assistant District Controller at Rugby and around 1950 he was working in the London Midland Region headquarters planning Royal Train journeys. All this was cut short when he lost his life at Harrow.

In 1922, he started taking railway pictures, outside the family circle, these remained unknown until 2000. Nash had, for one so young, a good eye for composition and a keen awareness of what would be a worthwhile subject. Great Western Dean Goods, the Ravenglass & Eskdale Railway, Sentinel steam railcars on Jersey, the Ashover Light Railway, Midland Railway 'Spinners', new LMS 'Royal Scots' or Southern Railway 'King Arthurs', all fill his albums.

His youngest daughter Kate Robinson and transport historian Robert Forsythe have shared the task of presenting his material. A series of retrospective exhibitions were staged in Cumbria to mark the 50th anniversary of his death in 2002-2003.

This new volume looks at the wider spread of Nash's pictorial material around Britain and examines his professional life as a career railwayman during which he was involved in some pioneering studies, including inter-war electrification proposals on the LMS. Newly originated hand prints from the original negatives have been made for the book by Kate Robinson.

The book is to A5 page size in landscape format, 192 pages, printed on high quality ivory silk paper, and includes just over 190 photographs. It is perfect bound with a square-backed spine and a laminated colour cover.

X78

ISBN 0 85361 619 1
ISBN 978 0 85361 619 1

£ 13.95

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TESTING TIMES AT DERBY - A 'Privileged View of Steam
by
Alan Rimmer

The author begins by describing how, when he left school in 1943, he embarked on an Engineering Apprenticeship with the London, Midland & Scottish Railway in its Derby Locomotive Works. This type of course had at an earlier time been called a 'Privileged Apprenticeship' and the term 'Priv' was still applied to the author and his colleagues - hence his 'Privileged' view of steam. Having described in some detail the pleasures and pains, and the trials and tribulations of his training, and the particular incident where he stood in for a colleague on one of the Locomotive Interchange Trials, which determined the direction that his career would take. Alan admits that his close acquaintance with steam locomotives led to the blossoming of an intense enthusiasm for steam, something that has never left him.

With his practical training behind him, office work within the Works is the next stop, and then the incident referred to above led to a move to the Locomotive Testing Section in the drawing office, where his work included test runs with 'Black Fives', 'Britannias' and 'Austerities' viewed from the dynamometer car, so that close encounters with steam engines once again became the order of the day. This was a fascinating period with many aspects, enabling the author to indulge in a wide range of experiences, including the schoolboy dream of driving a railway engine. A move into the Research Department (of what was by now British Railways) for some time, led to a gradual diminution in the steam content of his working life; nevertheless, various projects still came his way which enabled him, in one way or another, to have hands-on contact with steam locomotives for half of his railway career.

 

The book is to A5 format, consists of 120 pages with 88 illustrations and a laminated cover.

RS14

ISBN 0 85361 628 0
ISBN 978 0 85361 628 3

£ 9.95

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EDWARD THOMPSON OF THE LNER
by Peter Grafton

The author started work on this book not because he was strongly pro Thompson but because he was curious, curious about Thompson and about the way that he had been either roughly treated, or ignored by the earlier authors. In this respect Thompson was undoubtedly the architect of his misfortunes by virtue of his unapproachable manner. Whilst most experienced railway writers are capable of presenting reasoned and balanced views on a wide variety of railway topics from locomotive performance to high level decisions, it seems that the name of Thompson, particularly in context with that of Sir Nigel Gresley, causes an emotional disturbance.

If Edward Thompson is to be judged, by what standards is the judgement to be made? Is Bulleid judged on his ‘Leader’, Churchward and Raven on their Pacifics – all notable failures?

For too long, Thompson’s less successful locomotive designs have been stressed, whilst his successful contributions have been merely acknowledged in passing. This hardly leads to an objective assessment, but it has the dubious quality of popular appeal and the ears of railway enthusiasts have been inclined to the voices of those who have sought to discredit him.

Let the facts speak for themselves: of the locomotive work carried out whilst Thompson was chief mechanical engineer, 20 Gresley engines were rebuilt and four more modified from Gresley designs. Furthermore he did not make radical changes to the Gresley Pacifics and he continued with the ‘V2’ building programme until 1943. Is this the work of a man determined to be rid of Gresley? Nor must it be forgotten that Thompson also rebuilt several locomotives of both Robinson and Raven designs, but as far as can be ascertained, no one has sprung to their defence or accused him of trying to deface the image of these two engineers.

The success of Thompson’s two-cylinder locomotives is surely beyond question and, with the possible exception of the ‘L1’, compares very favourably with contemporary two-cylinder designs. Let Edward Thompson be remembered not only as the man who rebuilt some of the LNER’s sacred cows and sent members of Gresley’s staff into the wilderness, but also as the man who designed the ‘B1’, introduced the ‘O1’ and showed A.H. Peppercorn the way to the ‘A1’ and ‘K1’. Let it also be remembered that he was somewhat introspective, saddened by the untimely death of his wife and by his lack of a family: remember that Edward Thompson was human.

A5 format, 152 pages, 100 illustrations

                           Contents
Marlborough and Cambridge
The Raven Influence
Grouping and After
Stratford 1927-1933
Darlington 1934-1938
Doncaster 1938-1941
The Years in Office 1941-1946
Retirement 1946-1954
The Final Analysis
Epilogue
Summary of Thompson’s Locomotive Work
Locomotive Trials
Names, Numbers and Dates
Preservation

OL145

ISBN 978 0 85361 672 6

£ 12.95

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THROUGH THE RANKS ON THE SOUTHERN, A career in the Nationalised railway industry        
by Brian W. Aynsley

This book is based on the author’s career with ‘British Railways’ from 1956 to 1995, a career spanning almost 40 years and moving through from Victorian steam locomotive technology to the age of computers, and even included a spell on the Waterloo & City.

 

About 1954 Brian Aynsley discovered that there was a loco depot at Guildford and after that spent many happy hours watching the operations in and around that station. He was invited onto the footplate of an engine standing at the station and knew then when he left school he wanted to work on steam locomotives. This book then tells the story of his ensuing railway career from engine cleaner at Guildford onwards. He witnessed the demise of steam, the arrival of new motive power and the eventual restructuring of the nation’s railway network.

A5 format, 208 pages printed on art paper throughout, with 110 photographs. The book has a full colour laminated cover with a square-backed spine.
RS8

ISBN 0 85361 597 7
ISBN 978 0 85361 597 2

£ 13.95

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TORTILLARDS OF ARTOIS - The Metre Gauge Railways and Tramways of the Western Pas-de-Calais  
by Martin & Joan Farebrother
Tortillard - a definition
The name tortillard has been widely applied to narrow gauge steam railways and trains in France. The derivation is probably from the verb tortiller, to twist or twirl. The word has been used since the early 20th century. Probably a comment on the twisting or tortuous nature of many narrow gauge lines.  These trains have also attracted the title le tacot, tacot being a term for an old-fashioned and defective vehicle, or ‘old banger’.

Discover the charm of the Artois metre gauge railways and tramways - and indeed there is much to discover. In an area roughly bounded by Calais in the north, St-Omer and Aire-sur-la-Lys in the east, Anvin and Montreuil in the south and Berck-Plage, Le Touquet Paris-Plage, étaples, Hardelot Plage, Le Portel, Boulogne and Wimereux on the channel coast, at its most extensive there were 188 miles of metre gauge railways and urban and inter-urban tramways.

The lines themselves offer much variety from busy urban, to sleepy rural, routes. Some lines provided an escape to the coast for thousands of holidaymakers, but many felt the significant impact of two World Wars.
The metre gauge network of the area began with the opening of the first part of the Anvin-Calais line in 1881, and ended with the closure of the rump of the Anvin-Calais and Aire-Berck lines in 1955. The two principal lines, Anvin-Calais and Aire-Berck, were 59 miles and 60 miles long respectively. There were very few narrow gauge lines which were not metre gauge in the area, these were of 60 cm gauge, and they have been mentioned briefly for the sake of completeness.

These days the region is a major tourist destination for the British, but few know of the bygone age of metre gauge railways. Many walk the walls of Montreuil every year, little knowing about the old railway route below. The book concludes with what can be seen now, and some walks on parts of the former trackbeds.

So journey with us in a ‘battered, lightly-built but upholstered little vehicle’ from ‘Calais Town’s remotest bay’ to discover the delights of the tortillards of Artois.

This meticulously researched history, is well illustrated with 50 maps and drawings, and includes more than 200 photographs. A5 format, perfect bound with a square-backed spine, 336 pages.

See Book Review

X90

ISBN 978 0 85361 679 5

£ 19.95 / €32.00

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TRAMS AND BUSES OF POOLE   
by C.G. Roberts & B.L. Jackson
A detailed account of both tram and bus services in the Poole area over the past hundred years from the formation of the Poole & District Electric Traction Company to the modern vehicles in the Wilts & Dorset fleet. The take-over of the Poole Tramways by Bournemouth Corporation after only four years of operation is fully explained, as is the difficult relationship between the councils of both Boroughs. The activities and technical details of the trams and tramway are fully described as are the events leading up to their replacement with motor buses. The arrival and rapid expansion of Hants & Dorset and their turbulent relationship with other local bus operators, principally Poole & District Motor Services, and Miss Foott's, Rossmore Bus Company are included, as are details of many interesting motor buses between 1899 and 2001, and bus operation across the Sandbanks chain ferry. This work  gives a vivid account of bus operation in peace and war and the changing scene of the past 50 years, the subsequent privatisation of the bus industry and the events facing the new Wilts & Dorset Company as successors to the old Hants & Dorset in retaining their position against predators.

 

This is the first time a complete omnibus history of the Poole area has been published, it also highlights the social changes that have taken place as Poole has been reincarnated to take its place in the 21st century. The book is to A5 format, and consists of 208 pages with more than 180 photographs, drawings etc., it has a full colour laminated card cover.
X72

ISBN 0 85361 572 1
ISBN 978 0 85361 572 9

£ 13.95

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TRAMWAYS A VAPEUR DU TARN: A 60cm Railway in South-West France   
by Sarah Wright
The Tramways à Vapeur du Tarn is a 60 cm narrow gauge railway which can be found just 20 miles from Toulouse in south-west France. The original network was the second most extensive 60 cm system in France until closure in 1937, but part of the route has been revived as a tourist railway with further restoration of the route imminent. The line is well-known in France with its station in St Lieux, the trains set off through a village street, the route lies over a spectacular viaduct, overlooked by the precipitous village of Giroussens. This is followed by woodland, then water meadows until the terminus is reached. It is hoped that the book will appeal to railway enthusiasts, modellers, and those with a love of this spectacular region of France. The book contains many photographs, as well as maps, station layouts and sufficient drawings for the modeller to be able to recreate most of the locomotives and rolling stock of the railway. 
The book is to A5 format, and consists of 208 pages with more than 150 photographs, maps and plans of locomotives and rolling stock. it is printed on art paper throughout and has a full colour laminated card cover with a square-backed spine.  
X70

ISBN 0 85361 570 5
ISBN 978 0 85361 570 5

£ 13.95

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TRAMWAYS OF LYTHAM ST ANNES
by P.H. Abell, J. Garnham & I. McLoughlin
The districts of Lytham and St Annes have always had a character distinctive from that of their northern neighbour on the Fylde Coast, Blackpool. This is the story of a part of that distinctive character: the tramway history of the twin towns diverged from that of Blackpool from the start, with the courageous decision to employ gas trams, powered by the internal-combustion engine, which was to come to dominate passenger transport in the 20th century after the false dawn of the Edwardian tramway boom. Illustrated with over 170 photographs, plans, timetables etc. tracing the history of the trams until the system’s demise in 1937. There is also a look at a fanciful proposal to link the Lytham system to Southport. A5 format, with 128 pages and square-backed 2 -colour Linson cover.
LP189

ISBN 0 85361 475 X
ISBN 978 0 85361 475 3

£ 8.95

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UNDER 10 CMEs - Vol 1 - Dugald Drummond to W.A. Stanier, 1912-1944
by E.A. Langridge
Compiled and edited by John Marshall, Simon Marshall & Bruce Nathan                 
Review
Eric Arthur Langridge died in 1999, at the age of 102. He was little known to enthusiasts, until his retirement in 1959, when Eric became one of the most important contributors to locomotive history, particularly through his monumental series ‘Under 10 CMEs’, which appeared in the SLS Journal in 28 instalments between 1973 and 1988.

Eric was born in, 1896. Through family contacts, he went to Eastleigh in 1912 to serve an apprenticeship with the London & South Western Railway, nominally under Dugald Drummond. Eric’s first spell in the drawing office at Eastleigh was in 1916, when he did the valve gear for the ‘S15’ class 4-6-0, and in a later spell he did the valve gears of the 4-6-2T and 4-8-0T. In 1920 he moved to the Midland Railway at Derby. He commenced a 39-year-stint in the drawing offices there.

Although he designed many parts of the locomotive, it was eventually boilers that became his speciality. His most important work was in the Stanier era, firstly with the boiler for the Stanier ‘Jubilees’: this boiler formed the basis of all the Stanier class ‘3’ boilers, covering the 2-6-0s, the class ‘5’ 4-6-0s and the class ‘8’ 2-8-0. Later he designed the second variety of class ‘1’ boiler for the ‘Princesses’, and the class ‘3A’ boiler of the later ‘Jubilees’. Finally he did the preliminary layout of the ‘Duchess’, and then the detailed design of the boiler.

In 1946 he was appointed head of the development drawing office, and was involved with the post-war experimental class ‘5’ engines, and the main line diesels Nos. 10000/1. He became increasingly involved in diesel design, and ended his career as diesel assistant to the chief mechanical engineer  of the London Midland Region of British Railways.  

Fortunately for locomotive historians, Eric preserved the working notebooks that he had used throughout his time at Derby, together with a large collection of papers, many of them unique. The notebooks are particularly valuable in dating various stages in the evolution of the Stanier engines, they shed much light on contemporary Derby thinking.

Although many retired locomotive men have written autobiographies, most of them graduated into senior management positions, and were far removed from the detailed work of designing engines. Under 10 CMEs is unique in being written by a man who stayed close to detailed locomotive design for 40 years, including the early stages of the transition to diesel traction. No other writer has ever recorded in detail how and why locomotive designs evolved. Eric had a distinctive style of writing, well suited to his highly cynical view of some of the machinations of higher management.

                 Contents - Volume 1
Eric Arthur Langridge
Introduction
Dugald Drummond
R.W. Urie
Eastleigh Drawing Office
H. Fowler (Midland Railway)
G. Hughes
H. Fowler as CME, LMS
E.J.H. Lemon
W.A. Stanier
‘Coronations’, Diesel Shunters and Wartime

Eric was a valuable source of information for the authors of the RCTS Locomotives of the LMS series, and to anyone interested in the details of latter-day LMS and BR locomotives.

A5 format, 232 pages, 165 images, with a laminated card cover and a square-backed spine.

RS22A

ISBN 978 0 85361 701 3

£16.95

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UNDER 10 CMEs - Vol 2 - C.E. Fairburn to J.F. Harrison, 1944-1959
by E.A. Langridge
Compiled and edited by John Marshall, Simon Marshall & Bruce Nathan
                  Review
Eric Arthur Langridge died in 1999, at the age of 102. He was little known to enthusiasts, until his retirement in 1959, when Eric became one of the most important contributors to locomotive history, particularly through his monumental series ‘Under 10 CMEs’, which appeared in the SLS Journal in 28 instalments between 1973 and 1988.

Eric was born in, 1896. Through family contacts, he went to Eastleigh in 1912 to serve an apprenticeship with the London & South Western Railway, nominally under Dugald Drummond. Eric’s first spell in the drawing office at Eastleigh was in 1916, when he did the valve gear for the ‘S15’ class 4-6-0, and in a later spell he did the valve gears of the 4-6-2T and 4-8-0T. In 1920 he moved to the Midland Railway at Derby. He commenced a 39-year-stint in the drawing offices there.

Although he designed many parts of the locomotive, it was eventually boilers that became his speciality. His most important work was in the Stanier era, firstly with the boiler for the Stanier ‘Jubilees’: this boiler formed the basis of all the Stanier class ‘3’ boilers, covering the 2-6-0s, the class ‘5’ 4-6-0s and the class ‘8’ 2-8-0. Later he designed the second variety of class ‘1’ boiler for the ‘Princesses’, and the class ‘3A’ boiler of the later ‘Jubilees’. Finally he did the preliminary layout of the ‘Duchess’, and then the detailed design of the boiler.

In 1946 he was appointed head of the development drawing office, and was involved with the post-war experimental class ‘5’ engines, and the main line diesels Nos. 10000/1. He became increasingly involved in diesel design, and ended his career as diesel assistant to the chief mechanical engineer  of the London Midland Region of British Railways.  

Fortunately for locomotive historians, Eric preserved the working notebooks that he had used throughout his time at Derby, together with a large collection of papers, many of them unique. The notebooks are particularly valuable in dating various stages in the evolution of the Stanier engines, they shed much light on contemporary Derby thinking.

Although many retired locomotive men have written autobiographies, most of them graduated into senior management positions, and were far removed from the detailed work of designing engines. Under 10 CMEs is unique in being written by a man who stayed close to detailed locomotive design for 40 years, including the early stages of the transition to diesel traction. No other writer has ever recorded in detail how and why locomotive designs evolved. Eric had a distinctive style of writing, well suited to his highly cynical view of some of the machinations of higher management.

                     Contents - Volume 2
C.E. Fairburn
H.G. Ivatt
R.A. Riddles (BR HQ)
A Gresley Man comes to Derby
Problems with ‘Britannias’
A Final Steam Design and the First Diesel Railcars
R.C. Bond (BR HQ)
Diesel Design and Testing
Appendices
Sources and Bibliography
Index

Eric was a valuable source of information for the authors of the RCTS Locomotives of the LMS series, and to anyone interested in the details of latter-day LMS and BR locomotives.

A5 format, 224 pages, 127 images, with a laminated card cover and a square-backed spine.

RS22B

ISBN 978 0 85361 716 7

£ 16.95

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VALE OF GLAMORGAN RAILWAY      
by Colin Chapman
Colin Chapman continues his excellent surveys of railways in South Wales turning his attention this time to the Barry Railway’s route from Barry to Bridgend which runs via Rhoose, Aberthaw and Llantwit Major and remains open as a freight only line in the 1990s. Although the passenger service ceased in 1964 a number of proposals have been made to reintroduce passenger trains. Rhoose is the site of Cardiff’s airport and it may one day be possible to travel between Cardiff Central station and the airport by train instead of by the dedicated bus service.

For most of the 19th century the Vale of Glamorgan remained untouched by the rapid development of the railway system which occurred elsewhere in South Wales.

There was little, apart from its agricultural wealth and limestone resources, to attract the attention of railway companies or speculators, and there was never sufficient support available for the successful promotion of locally-based schemes. In addition, the terrain of much of the area was not particularly sympathetic to the activities of railway engineers. When railways eventually came to the Vale they were the product of outside forces and influences, with the needs of the local communities being very much a secondary consideration.

The book is to A5 format and is printed on 176 pages of art paper, it includes 164 photographs/drawings etc. with a two-colour Linson cover and a square-backed spine.

LP208

ISBN 0 85361 523 3
ISBN 978 0 85361 523 1

£ 11.95

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