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Books Out Of Print

The following books are now out of print.

ABERDARE RAILWAY      by the late Eric Mountford and R.W. Kidner
The story of one of South Wales most important lines. The great export coal trade from South Wales brought the rise of Cardiff from a comparatively minor harbour to one of the world's leading docks, due in no small measure to the efforts of the miners in the Aberdare valley, and also to the Taff Vale Railway for transporting the coal.
OL95
THE ALSTON BRANCH      by S. C. Jenkins
The 13 1/4 mile single branch from Haltwhistle to Alston was neglected by enthusiasts for many years, but having survived the Beeching closures it belatedly emerged as one of England's best-loved rural lines. When the axe finally fell in 1976, many people regarded the closure as a national tragedy.
OL80
THE BATH TRAMWAYS      by C.G. Maggs
Bath’s first trams were horse-drawn and the service was inaugurated in 1880. The electric trams were introduced in 1904, the system was to survive until 1939. Detailed maps of the routes operated are included. There are dedicated chapters covering rolling stock, the permanent way and electrical equipment, operation and accidents.
LP52
BARNSTAPLE and ILFRACOMBE RAILWAY     by C.G. Maggs
 
LP111
BRIDGEWATER RAILWAY     by J.D. Harrison
 
LP132
BRISTOL and GLOUCESTER RAILWAY and AVON & GLOUCESTERSHIRE RAILWAY      by C.G. Maggs
 
OL26
CIRENCESTER BRANCH      by Nigel Bray
The Cirencester branch ran from Kemble, on the Swindon-Gloucester line. It was to serve the historic Gloucestershire market town of Cirencester, which in Roman times was the second largest town in England, for more than 120 years.
LP207
CLIFF RAILWAYS OF THE BRITISH ISLES     by Keith Turner
For as long as the author can remember, he has been fascinated by cliff railways.
As a small boy, every seaside resort was judged on the basis of whether or not it possessed a pier, a miniature railway and - rarity of rarities - a cliff railway.
LP223
COLLETT C.B., A COMPETENT SUCCESSOR     by John Chacksfield
Charles Benjamin Collett was a skilled production man who, outside of the railway environment, was very much an introvert. However, he was most certainly capable of working closely with others, but he selected those in key positions under him carefully and made sure they followed his line of thinking.
OL121
THE CONISTON RAILWAY        by Robert Western
Lake Coniston might well have been the obvious destination for a railway, to provide access for visitors to enjoy this special area of the Lake District. Certainly Coniston did get a railway but providing a facility for visitors was not the primary reason for building it. Industrial commerce was the driving force, copper being the prime consideration.
LP232
CORK, BLACKROCK & PASSAGE RAILWAY
by A.T. Newham, revised by S.C. Jenkins
 
LP49
  CRAMPTON LOCOMOTIVE 
by M. Sharman                                                                                       
 
 
MS1
CROMFORD & HIGH PEAK RAILWAY     by A Rimmer
The book gives a fascinating insight into this unique railway with its rope-worked sections through the beautiful scenery of the Peak District. Much of the route is now the basis of a very popular footpath.
OL10
DORSET FOOTPLATEMAN - From Boyhood to Main Line Fireman
by
Fred Andrews
Fred Andrews has written his railway story, but it is more than that!  It covers a life growing up in Dorchester in the years prior to World War II, his career describing many different aspects of a life on the footplate, and much more.
RS9
ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO SWISS HERITAGE AND TOURIST RAILWAYS     by Mervyn Jones
This guide is intended to appeal to railway enthusiasts, holiday-makers and travellers who love Switzerland and wish to see this beautiful country from another perspective. It lists 117 locations where heritage and tourist railways and activities can be found.
X85
The Farranfore to Valencia Harbour Railway Vol. One: Planning, Construction and an Outline of Operation by Patrick O'Sullivan
The railway to Valencia Harbour was opened in 1893. It was the most Westerly point in Europe which could be reached by train.
OL126A
GIRVAN & PORTPATRICK JUNCTION RAILWAY
by C E J Fryer
Most railways were constructed with consideration for the services they could afford to places along the route. Not so with this railway, the main object was to complete a rail route from Glasgow and central Scotland by short sea crossing to Ulster and Belfast.
LP188
SIR HENRY FOWLER, A Versatile Life
by J. E. Chacksfield
Much has been written about Henry Fowler and the small engine policy which was, for so long, a Derby trait. But Fowler was also recognised as a competent organiser and delegator who was called in to Government service during World War I.
OL110
THE HEREFORD AND GLOUCESTER CANAL
by Dacvid Bick
Throughout the length and breadth of England, no major navigation is so lost in obscurity as the Hereford & Gloucester Canal. Apart from a brief account here and there, its story has never been told.
C8
ISLE OF MAN RAILWAY: Volume Two1905 - 1994 
by J.I.C. Boyd
Volume Two of the history of the Isle of Man Railway takes the reader from 1905 through to 1994. It follows the railway's fluctuating fortunes in the 20th century.
B2B
ISLE OF MAN RAILWAY: Volume 3              by J.I.C. Boyd
The concluding volume of James Boyd’s magnificent trilogy on the Isle of Man Railway. The route of the Isle of Man Railway and Manx Northern Railway and a survey of the IOMR and MNR locomotives and rolling stock are covered in detail.
B2C
ISLE OF PORTLAND RAILWAYS VOLUME 1, The Admiralty & Quarry Railways        by B.L. Jackson
Portland supported two standard gauge branch lines, various quarry railways, and the Admiralty Railway used in the construction of the Harbour Breakwater, which was part of the largest defence project undertaken by the Victorians.
OL106A
ISLE OF PORTLAND RAILWAYS VOLUME 2, The Weymouth & Portland Railway, Easton & Church Hope Railway    by B.L. Jackson

The stone trade was the reason for building a railway to the Island from the nearby town of Weymouth. Just under 4 miles long, the branch had a complicated history. The Easton & Church Hope Railway Company took 33 years to construct a branch.

OL106B
ISLE OF WIGHT HERE WE COME, The story of the SR's Isle of Wight ships during the war 1939-1945      by Hugh J. Compton
Pre-War the SR had 13 ships to cover the three routes. The onset of War was to change the picture greatly. The story of the services to the Island through these troubled years is told.
X58
THE ISLE OF WIGHT RAILWAY    by Richard Maycock & R. Silsbury
This is the first time that a serious attempt has been made to chart the history of the Isle of Wight Railway Company in detail. The book includes maps showing both the railway as built and what might have been, extracts from company documents, maps, drawings of stations, signalling, locomotives and rolling stock.
OL109

ISLE OF WIGHT RAILWAY  REVISITED  
by Colin Fairweather and Alan Stroud

Most of the photographs in this book were taken nearly a hundred years ago. Some even date from the 1890s. All the photographs were taken on glass negatives and apart from a handful, have not been seen since the day they were first printed.

X81

KENT AND EAST SUSSEX RAILWAY      by Stephen Garrett
One of the best known of the Colonel Stephens Railways.  Running his railway Empire from his office in Tonbridge.  The make do and mend spirit, and constant striving for greater economies made for some interesting ideas.  Archaic locomotives and rolling stock were employed on the KESR and helped it to survive until Nationalisation.
LP56
LEIGHTON BUZZARD LIGHT RAILWAY
by Sydney Leleux
In the LBLR’s heyday it was a mecca for enthusiasts of the Simplex and Motor Rail locomotives, which were kept active on this very busy little railway. Now  this popular preserved narrow gauge railway is one of the top tourist attractions in Bedfordshire.
OL96
LINCOLNSHIRE LOOP LINE (GNR) and the RIVER WITHAM
by A.J. Ludlam
A look at one of the Lincolnshire’s oldest railways. It was along the banks of the River Witham that the Great Northern Railway decided to lay the greater part of its Lincolnshire Loop Line.
LP190
THE LINCOLNSHIRE POTATO RAILWAYS   by Stewart E Squires
Lincolnshire and South Humberside is an area not noted for its narrow gauge railways.  It is not generally appreciated that over 140 route miles of track were laid on farms in at least 50 separate locations, from Alkborough on the banks of the River Humber to Crowland in the south.
LP163
LLANELLY  & MYNYDD MAWR RAILWAY  by M.R.C.Price
The origins of this historic railway take us back into the 18th century, the route linked Llanelli with Cross Hands and the collieries of the ‘Great Mountain’. In its final years it served the ‘super pit’ at Cynheidre.
OL84
LOUTH, MABLETHORPE and WILLOUGHBY LOOP LINE
by A.J. Ludlam
Both Willoughby and Louth lay on the East Lincolnshire Railway. However, a much more circuitous route via Sutton-on-Sea and Mablethorpe also linked these two railway junctions until 1960.  The line’s story is told here.
LP162
LYNN & DEREHAM RAILWAY  by S.C. Jenkins
This line linked Kings Lynn, Swaffham and Dereham. This book treats the former Norfolk Railway line between Dereham and Wymondham as an extension of the L&DR route, and in view of inter-related early histories of these two lines, the historical part of the text gives equal weight to both routes.
OL87
LYNTON & BARNSTAPLE RAILWAY, An Anthology
by D. Hudson & E. Leslie
This railway running for nearly 20 miles through some of the finest North Devon countryside, became a legend in its own short lifetime. The range of articles and extracts from other writings give a flavour of the charm and uniqueness of the railway.
X55
LYNTON & BARNSTAPLE RAILWAY, Yesterday & Today
by P. Gower, B. Gray & K. Vingoe
That the Lynton & Barnstaple Railway has reached its centenary of its opening rather more publicly than most former Southern Railway branch lines is mainly due to its narrow gauge, which was probably also one cause of its demise.
PS8
THE MID-WALES RAILWAY      by R. W. Kidner
Railway promoters tended to regard Mid-Wales as something to be got through. The Mid-Wales Railway did not own either of its termini so was always likely to have complex relationships; in physical contact with five other railways, and meddling in the affairs of others. The Mid-Wales was born in a short period of Welsh railway mania.
OL79
MOUNTAIN RACK RAILWAYS OF SWITZERLAND   
by J.R. Bardsley
A concise survey of Switzerland¹s much loved rack railways, with a brief history of each of these fascinating, and often spectacular railway lines.
PS9

NAILSWORTH AND STROUD BRANCH               by C.G. Maggs

This is the fascinating story of the railway, which had its junction with the Midland Railway's Bristol to Gloucester line at Stonehouse. Initially the line was built to Nailsworth. The intermediate station of Dudbridge became a junction when the line to Stroud was opened.
LP214

NARROW GAUGE RAILWAYS IN SOUTH CAERNARVONSHIRE
by James I. C. Boyd

James Boyd’s draws attention to a treasury of long-abandoned railways in South Caernarvonshire which, until the 1960s had been hardly investigated. He recounts the politics & infighting to secure a greater share of the North Wales slate industry traffic.
B4A

OAKWOOD PRESS: The First 80 Years 1931-2011 
by
Terence Mullarkey

The main purpose of this book, as well as briefly telling the story of Oakwood Press, is to detail and illustrate fully all of the books and associated items that Oakwood have published over the past 80 years.
X100

RADIO CAROLINE               by Ralph C. Humphries

‘Radio Caroline on 199, your all day music station’. These few words started a revolution in radio entertainment and popular music. All of a sudden pop music was being played all through the day, and then round the clock, 24 hours a day, instead of just one day a week!
X77
RAILWAYS OF PURBECK         by R.W. Kidner
With interest in the minor railways of Purbeck still growing, along with new developments on the Swanage Railway and the now freight-only line to Furzebrook, the author's earliest memories of the railways of Purbeck are green livery 'T1' class engines kept spotless by a friendly staff to the present time are presented.
LP68
RAILWAYS OF THE BAIE de SOMME        
by Philip Pacey with R. Arzul & G. Lenne
The extremely popular Chemin de Fer de la Baie de Somme, a metre gauge railway linking both sides of the spectacular Somme estuary with the main line at Noyelles, can be easily reached by English visitors.
X67
RAILWAYS OF THE CHANNEL ISLANDS A Pictorial Survey
by C.W. Judge
88 pages, 138 photographs, 4 maps, all printed on art paper throughout, A5 format, with a square-backed full colour glossy card cover.
PS1
RAILS TO THE KYLE OF LOCHALSH     by D. McConnell
The story of a truly remarkable railway constructed in one of the most remote regions in Britain.  The railway was initially built to Stromeferry on the shore of Loch Carron to connect with steamers to the islands.  Eventually the line to Kyle was built, and became the most expensive line in the British Isles to be constructed.
OL99
RAILWAYS TO NEW HOLLAND AND THE HUMBER FERRIES    
by A.J. Ludlam
The New Holland to Hull ferry was purchased by the Great Grimsby & Sheffield Junction Railway, in 1845, and the ferry service remained railway-owned until its demise coinciding with the opening of the Humber Bridge in June 1981.
LP198
RAILWAYS TO SKEGNESS     by A.J. Ludlam
In 1856, Skegness was described as ‘a pleasant village and bathing place’ which at that time had two hotels, but it was the arrival of the railway in 1873 that enabled the town to develop to the extent that it did. The branch to Skegness leaves the East Lincolnshire line at Firsby, and travels via Wainfleet, the original terminus of the route.
LP205
RHYMNEY RAILWAY         by R.W. Kidner
The story of one of South Wales most dynamic railway companies, it linked Rhymney, Dowlais, Merthyr, Pontypridd and Caerphilly to the port of Cardiff. The railway is best known for its carriage of huge amounts of coal. Locomotives were maintained at the railway’s impressive works at Caerphilly.
OL9
RISHWORTH BRANCH, THE        by J. N. Fisher
This Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway branch commenced in the West Riding town of Sowerby Bridge, just west of Halifax, and served Triangle, Ripponden and Rishworth on its journey up the Ryburn Valley. Its effect on the social and industrial life of the valley is examined here.
LP174
J.G.ROBINSON: A Lifetime's Work           by D. Jackson
The book gives an extremely readable account of this well-respected railwayman’s work in England and Ireland. Like many great railway families the Robinson’s originated in North East England. He was to design some of Britain’s most beautiful engines in the Edwardian Era with some still to be seen at work in the 1960s.
OL98
RYE and CAMBER TRAMWAY            by C.W. Judge
The Rye and Camber Tramway was a small and comparatively obscure 3 ft gauge ‘steam’ light railway, connecting the Cinque port of Rye in Sussex, with the splendidly wild and desolate area of sand dunes, under which the old town of Winchelsea was buried. It was possibly the first to convert from steam traction to petrol.
PS4
SCHULL & SKIBBEREEN RAILWAY            by J.I.C.Boyd
The Schull & Skibbereen Railway - once more aptly called a Tramway - was bankrupt almost from Day One, operated in a geographically hostile environment and, in the opinion of many, historically hostile too.  Like all such institutions, it was lovable and left behind a host of folklore which has grown in the telling.
OL108

SIDMOUTH & BUDLEIGH SALTERTON BRANCHES   by C.G.Maggs

Sidmouth was already popular as a health resort, before the railway age. In the line’s heyday, as well as local train services, there were through carriages from London, the Midlands and the North, helping to make Sidmouth a popular destination with holidaymakers.
LP193
  SOLWAY JUNCTION RAILWAY         by Stuart Edgar and J.M. Sinton
Linking the Maryport & Carlisle Railway with the Caledonian Railway at Kirtlebridge, via the spectacular Solway Viaduct, there was also a spur into the Glasgow & South Western Railway’s station at Annan. Disaster struck in the winter of 1880/1881. Ice caused 45 of the 193 piers and 37 girders to collapse. 
LP176
SOUTHERN RAILWAY PASSENGER VANS
by David Gould 
These vans were unusual in that they bore a likeness to the goods stock rather than passenger stock as was the norm elsewhere.
X50
STEAMING THROUGH THE WAR YEARS Reminiscences on the ex-GER lines in London     by Reg Robertson
Reg Robertson tells his story of life on the footplate in war torn London and working through the blackout, capturing the spirit of life on the railway and the companionship that was forged between footplate crews despite all the hardships.
RS3
  USA, 756th RSB at Newport (Ebbw Jn)
by
E.R.Mountford
Maps and informative text on the 'Americans in Wales' in World War II.
LP170
WENLOCK BRANCH: Wellington to Craven Arms    by K.B. Jones
The Wenlock branch with its four original constituent companies passed through areas as complex and diverse as its original organisation: from the slag tips and pennystone pit mounds of the East Shropshire coalfield to the wooded crest of Wenlock Edge and Ape Dale.
OL105
WENSLEYDALE BRANCH: A NEW HISTORY      by S.C. Jenkins
Running for almost 40 miles across the former North Riding of Yorkshire, the Wensleydale line was one of the longest secondary routes on the North Eastern Railway. Built in stages, this picturesque route eventually formed a link between the east coast main line at Northallerton and the Settle & Carlisle Railway at Garsdale.
OL86
WESTON, CLEVELAND & PORTISHEAD LIGHT RAILWAY
by
C.G. Maggs
One of the country’s more idiosyncratic railways. A railway that went into receivership shortly after completion of the route. Despite this unfortunate start, it was a line that amazingly survived for more than 40 years.
LP25
THE  WISBECH & UPWELL TRAMWAY
by Peter Paye
Passengers arriving by the Great Eastern Railway at the fenland port of Wisbech in the years before the Great War, intending to travel to the canal side villages to the south-east of the town, could be forgiven for disbelieving the sight which greeted them.
OL152
YEOVIL - 150 Years of Railway History
by B.L. Jackson
This is the story of intense rivalry between the independent railway companies of the Victorian era and their ambitions towards the west of England. The broad gauge Bristol & Exeter Railway and the GWR, against the standard gauge L&SWR.
OL128